Greetings, my fellow port swillers!

Ol’ Robbo likes to believe that he keeps up with things in general, so he was somewhat surprised that his first inkling that a nor’easter was inbound came last Thursday evening when the local schools started making noises about cancelling the next day due to “high wind warnings”.

Without any other source of information, I pretty much poo-pooed the “high wind warning” stuff.  Imagine my surprise, then, to wake up in the middle of the night and hear it blowing like a real summbich.  I also woke up just in time (about 3 ack emma) for the power to go out.

It finally came back on again just about 20 minutes ago (and it’s now about 7 pip emma Monday evening).

We weren’t quite reduced to burning the furniture and eating the cats, but it was not a pleasant weekend.

This is about the third or fourth extended power-outage (meaning more than 24 hours) that I can recall experiencing in our 18 years in Port Swiller Manor.  At least with the summah storm ones, I can hide from the heat in the basement in relative comfort.  In the winter? One really can’t escape the cold.

UPDATE:  Greetings, again, my fellow port swillers!

Yes, friends of the decanter, it’s two posts in one!  Ol’ Robbo had meant to write more last evening when the lights first came back on, but he was so tired he simply slapped up the above and let it go at that.  Therefore, a few more details:

Eldest Gel’s spring break began on Friday, which meant she had to drive home in the teeth of the storm. You can imagine how I felt on having to welcome her back to a house with no power and no heat.  FWIW, she was an awfully good sport about it.

Skimming the nooz articles, I see that, at least in terms of winds and damages, the press are comparing this storm to the great Derecho  of 2012, the summah storm about which I was thinking when I wrote the above.  The big difference is that this time around, the wind blew like hell for a good 48 hours, while the derecho was over and done in about ninety minutes.  (Interesting that the destruction – from what I’ve seen – was more or less the same: Some respectable limbs down in the Port Swiller yard and a healthy number of whole trees elsewhere.)

The lovely and talented Diane mentions the Great Port Swiller Generator Debate in the comments.  Yes, Mrs. R was on the phone getting quotes as early as Saturday afternoon, but I counseled a cooling off period before we think about this investment again.  Honestly, I would be happy if we could find something just powerful enough to keep the HVAC operational, and maybe the fridge.  The rest (lights, laundry, oven, etc.) we can do without until whatever the situation is over.

Speaking of which, at one point over the weekend Youngest Gel said, “This is SO like living in the Middle Ages!”  I replied, “Middle Ages,  hell!  This is the way most people (including most Americans) lived not much more than a hundred years ago.  So stuff it.”  Ain’t I the Greatest Dad?

Situations like this ultimately remind Ol’ Robbo of the sobering fact that in the event of a real catastrophe – say a North Korean EMP burst or the Yellowstone Caldera cooking off – we are, to put it simply, doomed.  I guess I’m just not…passionate enough to go all Prepper and stockpile the basement with five years’ worth of food, supplies, and ammunition.