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A nice little article in the Virginny Pilot about a new archeological survey of Civil War wrecks in the James caught ol’ Robbo’s eye (and gave him an excuse to post the above print):

The archaeological survey of the USS Cumberland and CSS Florida is being conducted by the National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration and the U.S. Navy, a news release from NOAA said. Researchers are using sonar technology to create three-dimensional maps of the two shipwrecks to analyze their current conditions and better understand the technological innovations of the time.

The Cumberland, a 1,726-ton wooden frigate, was lost on March 8, 1862, during the Battle of Hampton Roads, when the Confederate ironclad CSS Virginia, formerly the USS Merrimack, rammed the Cumberland. It went down with more than 100 men. Nearby are the remains of the notorious Confederate commerce raider Florida. In late 1864, a Union warship seized the Florida at a harbor in Brazil and towed it to Hampton Roads, where it was rammed by a U.S. Navy troop ferry on Nov. 19, 1864, and sent to the bottom.

The Cumberland has been surveyed before.  Apparently, this is the first time the Florida has been gone over.

The entire article isn’t much longer than this, but it’s well worth clickying over.  Apparently, the author foozled the names of the ships in an earlier version (since corrected), causing something of a historickal flame war to break out in teh comments and leading on to some general scathing remarks about grammar, publick education and journalists as a whole.

My beef? Referring to a ship as “it” instead of “she” or “her.”  I suppose that’s in the journalistic standards manual somewhere, but it also indicates to me an absence of love for the sea.

 

Jonah links to this story from the Left Coast:

Redwood Heights Elementary School in Oakland, CA has joined the chorus of those wishing to mainstream “gender-bending” by enacting a program this week that, according to a press release, tells kindergarteners “there are more than two genders.”

The kindergarten through fifth grade school hosted a 2-day program for students titled, “Gender Spectrum Diversity Training,” in which single-sex Hawaiian geckos and transgender clownfish were brought in to teach children that “there are different ways to be boys. There are different ways to be girls,” according to Redwood Heights principal Sara Stone. Students received gender diversity training as they learned about “boy snakes that act ‘girly’.”

This is only the latest example of what seems to be a New-Age, gender-bending agenda pushed into the mainstream media by those who refuse to accept the traditional sex differences between men and women. A couple in Toronto, Canada has sparked outrage because they refuse to assign a specific gender to their infant “Storm,” preferring instead to believe “a child’s sex should not determine his or her place in the world.”

I didn’t say anything about that Toronto story when it appeared, but now, a few weeks on, it seems that the story was just part of a sudden eruption of this kind of thing.  Why now?

Of course, “sex” is a term of biology, while “gender” is a term of politics.  I need hardly tell any of you lot which one I find to be loathsome.

As it happens, after much prodding from the Mothe, I am now deep into Simon Sebag Montefiore’s Stalin: The Court of the Red Tsar.  Of course, it is filled with discussion of the Communist vision of the “New Man” and the need of the Reds to wipe out anything and everything (and, I should say, anyone and everyone) that stood in the way of their campaign to create him.  I see a lot of the same sort of thing here, although since its Modern Progressivistas driving things, I suppose we should refer to it as the “New Person.”

*For the benefit of the Mothe, “Lola” was a song by the Kinks back in the 70’s about a fellah getting tangled with a transvestite in a dance club.  Money lyric: “Girls will be boys, and boys will be girls.
It’s a mixed up, muddled up, shook up world, ‘cept for Lola.” 

Today is the anniversary of the Battle of Monmouth, fought in 1778.  I haven’t anything particularly illuminating to say about the battle, but instead post on it just because it gives me an excuse to put up the above painting by Emanuel Gottlieb Leutze, which depicts Washington arriving on the scene to rally the troops, who were beginning to crumble and fall back under the leadership of the hapless Maj. Gen. Charles Lee (who was eventually cashiered for his incompetence).  The painting has always been a favorite of mine, but I’ve always wondered about the dog in the foreground. It looks like some kind of retriever.  What’s it doing there?  Is it just an artistic device to allow Leutze to frame two men (one, apparently its owner) bowing down in Old George’s presence?  Or is there some point about canine warfare? And what’s that white thing in its mouth? Did it just steal somebody’s hanky? Bad dog!

This, by the bye, is the battle from which the main story/legend of Mary Ludwig Hays, aka Molly Pitcher is said to arise.  If it was as hot that day as it is today (and you get that impression from Leutze’s painting), I can readily see why soldiers were collapsing from the heat and why the bearers of water on the field were so important.

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